Posts Tagged ‘mudhoney’

Mudhoney – Still Going Strong

December 11, 2013

Mudhoney

Once on the verge of super-stardom, Mudhoney now sticks to mostly small clubs, but every once in a while (like right now) they get back to the top and do an arena tour opening for Pearl Jam. Not too shabby for a band who started in 1988 and practically started grunge and was (and continues to be) the poster boy Sub Pop. While never making the highest of heights like their contemporaries did, they still have left an indelible mark on music, and continue to put out great music.

I had the tremendous opportunity to go see them in concert in he fall in a tiny little cracker box known as U Street Music Hall. It was amazing to see a band like Mudhoney  at a venue as small as that, especially since they were about a month away from an arena tour with Pearl Jam. I wasn’t about to complain, though. The venue was so small that it could have taken place in 1988, or 89 when the band, and Grunge Rock as a whole, was just finding it’s legs.

Some will tell you that Grunge began with Mark Arm’s previous band Green River and the other bands of that era. That’s the best starting point this blogger has come across, but it really didn’t break out of Seattle until Mudhoney’s 1988 single “Touch Me I’m Sick“. Even though the song is 25 years old, when they played it in 2013, the place went just as nuts as they would have in 1988. It was an incredible thing to witness.

They have not slowed down at all. After trying their luck at a major label with limited success, they found themselves back at their roots – Sub Pop. They have released and re-released several albums in the latter part of last decade, and show no signs of slowing. They’re newest album, “Vanishing Point” hits just as hard as their earlier albums. They have not lost their edge and are great to see live. Giving up on Mudhoney would be a huge mistake.

One last thing. It would be a huge mistake if I didn’t mention that I had the tremendous opportunity to meet their legendary drummer Dan Peters after the show in the fall. It was an amazing experience to met one of my musical heroes. He was extraordinarily nice.

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Sub Pop 25th Anniversary Silver Jubilee

November 20, 2013
Surfing640

Photo by: John Pusieski

Living on the East coast, I didn’t give much initial thought going to the Sub Pop Silver Jubilee. Sure, it’s my favorite label, but the concert was in Seattle, nearly 3,000 miles away. A friend of mine shared the link with me and the seed was planted. Fortunately, my family lives in Southern Washington, but Seattle was still very far away from them. I made the mistake of looking at the lineup. I knew I HAD to be there. The same friend who planted the seed happens to live near my parents so we made plans to drive to Seattle.

I was getting excited. I was about to live out my dream of seeing all these pioneers of the grunge movement in a single day. We quickly made our list of who we needed to see. That list included: Jack Endino’s Earthworms, TAD, Mudhoney, Father John Misty, and if we had time, we wanted to check out J. Mascis and Greg Dulli.

July 13 came quickly and we were ready. We got to Georgetown Park, the location of the festival, about an hour before the first band was scheduled to get the lay of the land. After looking around for a bit, we stopped in to a local record store and saw the most amazing Nirvana/grunge vinyl collection I have ever seen. Right around the corner from that store was the infamous Sub Pop Mega-Mart. I picked up some 45 adapters and a Sub Pop Jones Cola and I was on my way.

Fortunately for us, Jack Endino’s Earthworms and TAD were playing on the same stage right after each other, so we didn’t have to move for a while. The stage was sponsored by the Elysian Brewing Company, so we helped ourselves to some Loser Pale Ale and their Nevermind Pale Ale. Now it was time for Endino’s Earthworms! While they were getting ready, I got to meet one of my heroes:

Jack Endino

Photo by John Pusieski

Here is a video of the man and the band playing. The entire show was awesome. They played a lot of original stuff, a Mudhoney cover, and, the highlight for me, a Screaming Trees cover featuring Connor brother Pat.

Tad, who was touring with his current band Brothers of the Sonic Cloth, came on next and he came on heavy with a hard-hitting set that pleased everyone. There was even a mosh pit and crowd surfing – a rarity at shows that I usually go to these days. Here’s a little taste of what he brought to the table. Our ears were ringing for sure.

After Tad, we have some time to mill around. We bought some more merchandise, caught a bit of J. Mascis and Greg Dulli. We then went to stake out a spot for Mudhoney. We did not have the best view, but it did not lessen our experience at all. We were still able to rock out like we were half our age.

After Mudhoney, we were ready to head back to our hotel. We had been there, standing, for eight hours, had three full concerts, bits and pieces of several others, and  walked about five miles just back and forth around the event. to put it mildly, we were exhausted. We were able to see a tiny bit of Father John Misty on our way out, so it wasn’t all bad.

Thanks to Sub Pop for making a bunch of losers feel like a king for a day. If the next 25 years are even half as good as the first 25 years, we’re in for some awesome music.

For more photos by John, visit his website at http://personal-spectrum.com/

Nirvana Pt. 1

September 16, 2008

Let me start out and state, in my opinion, there would be no Nirvana without the Melvins. Would Kurt have started a band? Probably. However, the chances of that band being with Krist Novosellic, and Kurt getting to record a demo would be extremely low had it not been for the Melvins. Now then, let’s dice right in.

The year was 1985. Kurt Cobain was in high school without hardly any friends and was being shuffled around relatives for a place to stay. He had heard of the band called the Melvins and went to a practice of theirs (a common hangout place for music people). He saw a really tall guy (6’7″) that he recognized from school. This guy was Krist and he listened to punk rock and could play bass guitar.

Kurt really wanted to start a band with Krist, but Krist showed little interest. He went down to Reciprocal Recordings with Dale Crover (100% of the reason Endido gave this Kurt guy the time of day) and they recorded a demo called “Fecal Matter”. Kurt gave this tape to Krist and he was finally convinced. All they needed now was a drummer.

They had simple requirements – someone who was willing to practice 5 days a week. They found a Chad Channing. He had a goofy drum set, and he didn’t do everything exactly the way Kurt would’ve liked him to, but he was there 5 days a week. Now that they had all the pieces in place, they were ready to rock.

They performed at a few clubs under numerous names (Skid Row, Pen Cap Chew…etc) until they finally settled on a name – Nirvana. They felt pretty confident about their songs and started shopping themselves around to labels. They sent tapes to Touch & Go, K Records, and Sub Pop. Sub Pop was the only label to bite and signed Kurt. They went into the recording studio with Jack Endido.

They recorded their first single, “Love Buzz” and wanted the song “Blandest” to be the B-Side. However, Endido thought the title resembled the song and balked. Nirvana decided to go with “Big Cheese” instead. So the first installment of the Sub Pop Singles Club was Nirvana’s Love Buzz b/w Big Cheese. the 7 inch vinyl’s were hand numbered to 1000 and were quickly snatched up. Nirvana was pissed because they were at shows and people wanted their stuff, but they had nothing to give them. the ploy worked though because there was so much demand that when Bleachwas finally released, there was a lot of underground hype for it.

When Nirvana was recording Bleach, they had to come up with $606 dollars to pay Endido for the studio time. Well, being completely broke, Nirvana did not have that kind of money. Enter Jason Everman. They struck a deal with Everman. If he paid the money, he could join their band. They even gave him a guitar credit on Bleach despite not playing on it. After Bleach came out, they went on tour to promote it. They were living their dream. Kurt noted that the tour was great, but wouldhave been better if “Jason wasn’t such a prick”. Everman was kicked out of the band shortly after the Bleach tour.

After the Bleach tour, they had another problem. They grew increasingly frustrated with Chad Channing, so they wrote him a letter effectively kicking him out of the band. So now they had no drummer again. They played shows with Dan Peters, but h had to go back to Mudhoney. They played some shows with Dale Crover, but he had to go back to the Melvins. They let Aaron Bruckhard play with them, but he still wasn’t what they were looking for. Buzz, from the Melvins knew a guy.

DC Punk band, Scream, was touring LA and their band literally fell apart, and they broke up in Los Angeles. Kurt called their drummer, Dave Grohl, and told him to come to Seattle to be in their band. Grohl had nothing to lose so he went up to Seattle. He was everything Nirvana was looking for in a drummer, and now in 1990, 5 years after “Fecal Matter”, they were complete.

To be continued…

Todd

Review: MOJO Magazine: Aug. 2008

August 16, 2008
August 08

MOJO Magazine August 2008

The current issue of MOJO Magazine is devoted to the 20th anniversary of Sub Pop records. It does not just mention the anniversary, it tells the story of the history of the label and its influence on music. Of course, it is impossible to talk about Sub Pop without talking about Nirvana, so the magazine also dedicates the cover and a feature story about Sub Pop’s most famous band.

For the Sup Pop interview, they got together “grunge royalty” if ever there was such a thing. They brought in former Nirvana drummer Chad Channing, Mudhoney and Green River frontman Mark Arm, and TAD frontman Tad Doyle. They also brought together the founders of Sub Pop Records Jonathan Poneman and Bruce Pavitt. The article talks about the very humble beginnings where they would ship orders from the Musak Corporation where Pavitt worked part time until 1988. It is a true DIY label and pretty soon the Major labels could not avoid it.

The article really starts with the culmination of Sub Pop’s efforts: Lamefest in 1989. The Lamefest show sold out the iconic Moore Theater in Seattle headlined by all local bands, a feat that was thought to be out of the question. This showed Pavitt and Poneman that they were on to something. Bands like Green River, TAD, Mudhoney, Nirvana, and Mother Love Bone really helped define the Seattle Sound as well as Sub Pop itself.

Sub Pop has had its ups and downs over the last 20 years, but with bands like Iron and Wine, Flight of the Conchords, Mudhoney, and The Gutter Twins they are as strong as ever. The magazine also comes with a free CD titled “The Sub Pop 300.” It has some of the same tracks as the Sub Pop issue “The Grunge Years” but there are some great tracks including: “Change Has Come” by the Screaming Trees, “Shove” by L7, and “Retarded” by the Afghan Whigs. There are also tracks by other Sub Pop artists like Pissed Jeans, Red Red Meat, and Flight of the Conchords.

Todd


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